Putting Your Mind at Ease by Making Every Day of the Week Unique

Putting Your Mind at Ease by Making Every Day of the Week Unique

Do you ever feel like your workdays all run together? That they are all equally chaotic and often, unproductive as we get jerked into urgent, but frequently non-essential, tasks?

A secret I heard about a year and a half ago was the idea of combating this inevitability by making each day of the week unique in some way. This idea isn’t novel by any means, and after I heard it for the first time, I heard it in several different contexts from several different people – productivity experts mainly, of the likes of Michael Hyatt.

What exactly does it mean, then? This idea of assigning “themes” to our days?

It essentially means finding some way – large or small – to make each day unique. As a fun example, it can be as small as saying, Tuesday is taco night. But when it comes to your practice, it can be as transformative as, “I handle all my marketing on Mondays. I handle administrative tasks on Wednesdays. I do ‘deep work’ on Thursdays. I network on Fridays,” etc.

The benefit of this approach: you always have a designated portion of your week to knock out certain nagging tasks.

Not to mention, putting your “themed” tasks into buckets, so to speak, relieves decision fatigue. You know, without question, what you will do on a particular day – even if you don’t have your entire day mapped out, you at least know when certain tasks will get done. As a result, your weeks will no longer blur together into one confusing and vaguely memorable mass. You will know what you did in a given week and in the upcoming week, you will similarly know what’s on your plate.

This week, why don’t you give this a try?

First, make a list of recurring items that are on your to do list but often get pushed to the bottom of your list of priorities, for instance, certain clients, a research project, responding to emails, returning calls, marketing, and bookkeeping.

Next, assign yourself a day to tackle these tasks. If you don’t want to do this day-by-day, you can also handle it in “chunks,” e.g., designating afternoons between 4 and 5 as your time to return calls or emails or to work on your social media marketing campaigns.

Finally, alert your colleagues to your new plan so they are aware of what you are doing, when. That way, you can guarantee your assistant won’t interrupt you on a day you’ve earmarked for intensive work, and that your associates are aware that on marketing days, they are expected to help you implement the firm’s marketing and networking plans.

 How do you plan and structure your weeks? Let us know in the comments!

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